10 Ted Talks Job Seekers can Learn From

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Ted Conferences, LLC(Technology, Entertainment, Design) is a media organization which posts talks online for free distribution, under the slogan “ideas worth spreading”. TED’s early emphasis was technology and design, consistent with its Silicon Valley origins. However, TED has since widened its focus to include talks from many scientific, cultural, and academic disciplines as well.

Since June of 2006, TED has started to offer its content and videos for free online. Furthermore, as of this year, over 2,600 “TED Talks” have been offered for free on their website.  As early as November 2012, TED Talks had been watched over one billion times worldwide. Not all TED Talks are equally popular, however. Those given by academics tend to be watched more online while art and design videos tend to be watched less than average. Check out these 10 inspiring, motivating Ted Talks when you’re in the job market or thinking about your career. They’ll make you think, analyze your goals and fears squarely in the face, and give you some much-needed perspective during a time of great change and opportunity. 

 

1. Jason Shen, “Looking for a job? Highlight your ability not your experience” 

Excellent advice from Jason Shen on how to stand out to potential employers; especially relevant for those job seekers who are switching industries or trying something new. Shen says: “Until we get a holistic view of someone, our judgment of them will always be flawed. Let’s stop equating experience with ability, credentials with competence.”

 

2. Siddhartha Roy, “Science in service to the public good”

If you’re looking for a new job in the sciences, it’s the perfect time to remind yourself why you do what you do. Roy calls on professionals in the sciences and engineering to serve society and be “aware of the tremendous power their knowledge and decisions have.”

 

3. Dan Ariely, “What makes us feel good about our work?”

There’s no better time to reassess your priorities than when you’re on the job market. Ariely makes the case that job satisfaction and overall happiness has less to do with your bank account and more to do with purpose and progress

 

4. Tim Ferris, “Why you should define your fears instead of your goals”

Change, even when it’s positive like getting a new job, can be scary. Ferris explains why you should face these fears head-on, even embrace them, and how doing so can actually make you more successful.

 

5. Scott Dinsmore, “How to find work you love”

Dinsmore speaks from experience and puts his valuable career advice into simple, easy-to-follow terms.

 

6. Emilie Wapnick, “Why some of us don’t have one true calling”

Do you have, as Wapnick calls it, “multipotentialities?” Some people are meant to have multiple career shifts throughout their lives. Wapnick explains why that’s nothing to be ashamed of but, instead, celebrated.

 

7. Carol Fishman Cohen, “How to get back to work after a career break”

A must-watch talk for anyone who is heading back to the job market after taking a break. Cohen gives sage advice to both employers and job seekers on why gaps in employment periods can actually work in your favor.

 

8. Larry Smith, “Why you will fail to have a great career”

Smith’s humorous yet all-to-true talk will actually inspire you to take a risk, face your fears, stop making excuses, and go after what you really want. One of the fresher, more convincing takes on the old career advice to “follow your passion.”

 

9. Shawn Achor, “The happy secret to better work”

Achor believes happiness creates better work, not the other way around.

 

10. Angela Lee Duckworth, “Grit: The power of passion and perseverance”

Over 13 million people have viewed Duckworth’s popular talk, and with good reason. Her evaluation of “grit” as a key indicator of success is sage advice for anyone seeking to be more productive, successful, balanced, and happy.

 

Feeling inspired? Motivated? Ready for a change? If you’re in the job market or thinking about switching into a new set of responsibilities, consider Compass Consulting Group to aid you in such a monumental transition! Feel free to check out our current opportunities, and feel free to contact us at (925)884-3811 or by sending us an email to Requests@CompassCGroup.com.

 

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